Transcript of Sawmill Man v. The People

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Reason: Estate agent on-trial talking on the prosecution side
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This transcript involves dialogue with Clerk, Judge, Prosecutor, Defender, The Jury, Will, Bill, and the player.

Court Documents[edit | edit source]

Court summons[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Court summons (Sawmill Man v. The People).

Court summons
You have been summoned to the Seers' Village courthouse to work on the case of Sawmill Man v. The People.

Please present yourself to the court clerk at your earliest convenience.

Statements[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 1 (Sawmill Man v. The People).

Evidence: Statements

Submitted to the court as evidence.
File 1:

CONFIDENTIAL

Patent: Sawmill Bill's Supersteady Plankmaker

The Supersteady Plankmaker was designed and built by Bill for the creation of wooden planks. Its design is patented and protected for business security.

Protection methods: The sawmill is to remain locked to everyone aside from selected staff. No one is to take equipment out of the mill without the mill owner's permission.

File 2:

Dear Arnie,
Thank you for alerting me to Will's actions. I fear I'll have to take action against his opening of a competing mill. He knows too many trade secrets, and he helped construct my patented Supersteady Plankmaker. I will inform you of what I'm going to do.
Your friend,

Bill

Circumstances and evidence[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 2 (Sawmill Man v. The People).

Evidence: Circumstances

Suspect: Bill
Case Background: Will, a mill worker, is bringing suit against Bill, the mill owner, for monopolising the plank industry ang erecting insurmountable barriers to entry. Will planned to leave the mill and open his own near Taverley; however, every time he tried to buy land, Bill prevented it by making a much higher offer. Bill maintains that he was protecting his business, and that Will was stealing trade secrets by opening a competing business.

All witnesses are present at the courthouse, ready for interviewing.

Character background[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 3 (Sawmill Man v. The People).

Character Background

Suspect: Bill
Background: Bill, the mill owner, has been in the business for years. He's been the sole wholesale provider of planks to the adventurers of RuneScape.

Victim: Will, a mill worker
Background: Will has been learning his trade at the mill for years. He's a loyal worker, but is ready to start his own business.

All witnesses are present at the courthouse, ready for interviewing.

Pre-trial[edit | edit source]

Starting the case[edit | edit source]

Talking to the Clerk about the Court summons[edit | edit source]

Searching the File cabinet[edit | edit source]

Talking to Sawmill operator[edit | edit source]

  • Player: I need to ask some questions about the charges against you for unfair trade.
  • Sawmill operator: Okay, okay, get on with it.
  • Ask about:
    • Can you tell me about your sawmill business?
      • Player: Can you tell me about your sawmill business?
      • Sawmill operator: I started it up about three years ago. I saw that there was an opportunity to provide the people of Gielinor with quality building supplies. My mill's lot was in an empty and derelict area south of the Wilderness, so I managed to get it at a low price. Since then it's expanded, and I have three full-time workers and some work experience kids that come and go.
      • Player: You're the only lumber mill in all of Gielinor, is that correct?
      • Sawmill operator: That's right! No one can compete with my prices or efficiency. I was a bit worried when the Grand Exchange opened, but sales haven't slowed down one jot.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Will, your worker?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Will, your worker?
      • Sawmill operator: I took Will in as a young lad and trained him up. He's been a good worker, until he got it in his head that he'd learned all he could, and wanted to go off to start his own business. I just don't understand it. Whatever happened to loyalty?
      • Player: Did you try talking to him about it?
      • Sawmill operator: I did, but he didn't want to hear a word. He made me so angry that I wanted to do anything to stop him.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
      • Player: Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
      • Sawmill operator: Look, I know what you're getting at, but I was just preventing him from stealing the trade secrets that I worked hard to develop. He learned everything he knows from me and my mill, and now he wants to use that knowledge to undercut me and put me out of business. It's not right.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why are you both in jail?
      • Player: Why are you both in jail?
      • Sawmill operator: When Will brought suit against me, I counter-sued. So, both of us are accused of crimes and have to remain here until our day in court. This is a horrible time for a small business man, like myself, as I lose money every day I'm in here.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • I don't have any more questions.
      • Player: I don't have any more questions.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Talking to Will[edit | edit source]

  • Player: I need to ask you some questions about the monopoly case.
  • Will: Fine, let's get it over with.
  • Ask about:
    • Did you help Bill build his Supersteady Plankmaking machine?
      • Player: Did you help Bill to build his Supersteady Plankmaking machine?
      • Will: Help him? I designed it! I'm a natural with machines.
      • Player: Were you planning on using the same machine when you started your own business?
      • Will: Well, yeah. It was my idea, so why shouldn't I?
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was it like working at the mill?
      • Player: What was it like working at the mill?
      • Will: It was great at first, working with the machines and learning new skills, but I got tired of just being a 'worker'. I wanted to be my own boss.
      • Player: What about your co-workers? Do you get on with them?
      • Will: Oh, Phil and Jill are okay. We've seen some good times, although Jill is quite aloof. She thinks we shouldn't hang out, as she's the overseer.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Could you tell me about trying to start your own business?
      • Player: Could you tell me about trying to start your own business?
      • Will: Well, the management structure is pretty flat at the sawmill, so I was never going to get promoted. That made me think: 'why can't I have my own mill?'. So, I saved up money and started looking for locations. I wanted to take it far from Bill's mill, so I wasn't stealing his business, and Taverley seemed a decent distance away. But, everytime I tried to buy land, 'someone' had already put in a greater bid. The estate agent finally admitted that it was Bill. That's when I decided to bring in the law to sort it out.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why are you both in jail?
      • Player: Why are you both in jail?
      • Will: When I brought suit against Bill, he counter-sued. So, we're both here, waiting for the issue to get resolved.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • I don't have any more questions.
      • Player: I don't have any more questions.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Talking to Estate Agent[edit | edit source]

  • Player: What are you here for?
  • Estate Agent: I'm a witness in this case, so I have to remain here for questioning. They ran out of jail cells, so I'm just admiring the architecture of the courthouse. I could do wonders with this place.
  • Player: I have some question for you.
  • Ask about:
    • You were finding land for Will, right?
      • Player: You were finding land for Will, right?
      • Estate Agent: Yes, Will commissioned me to find somewhere cheap and away from the sawmill.
      • Player: What happened?
      • Estate Agent: Well, Bill and I go a long way back. He started up his business when I did and we keep in touch; so I may have mentioned to him that Will was looking for land, which sent Bill into a rage! He insisted that I inform him of any offers that Will made, so he could outbid him.
      • Player: You agreed to that?
      • Estate Agent: I had to! Bill could put me out of business if he cuts off my customers' supply of planks.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Bill's business?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Bill's business?
      • Estate Agent: Bill started his business shortly after I started mine; it was a good match, since I was selling plots of land and he was selling the tools to improve them. We've made a great deal of money in the last few years.
      • Player: You both certainly know how to make a profit.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Bill and Will?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Bill and Will?
      • Estate Agent:They were like father and son. I'm sure Bill would have been more reasonable if Will had talked to him about it. Nobody needed to get dragged to court.
      • Estate Agent: It's very bad for business.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • I don't have any more questions.
      • Player: I don't have any more questions.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Enter the court room[edit | edit source]

Trial[edit | edit source]

Commencement[edit | edit source]

Opening statement[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Thank you, Your Honour. Members of the Jury, I am going to present you with evidence that decisively proves that Bill, the sawmill owner, monopolised the lumber industry and actively prevented any competition.
  • (Same as 'Your Honour, I'd like to present evidence.' below.)

If defending:

Talking to the judge[edit | edit source]

  • Judge: What can I do for you?
    • Your Honour, could you explain what I need to do?
    • Your Honour, I'd like to present evidence.
    • Your Honour, I'd like to call a witness.
      • Player: Your Honour, I would like to call a witness.
      • If the player did not interview anyone prior to the trial:
        • Judge: You haven't interviewed anyone. That's going to make it hard for you to ask them pertinent questions, don't you think?
      • Otherwise:
        • Choose your witness:
          • Bill - sawmill owner.
          • Will - sawmill worker.
          • Estate agent.
          • No one at this time. I would like to present physical evidence.
          • No one at this time. I would like to finish and summarise my case.
            • Player: No one at this time, Your Honour. I would like to finish my presentation by summarising my case to the Jury.
            • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)
    • Your Honour, I'd like to summarise my case.
      • Player: Your Honour, I would like to finish by summarising my case to the Jury.
      • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)

Presenting evidence[edit | edit source]

File 1[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #1: A patent filed by Bill for his Supersteady Plankmaker machine.
  • The Prosecution presents the patent as evidence.
    • This patent demonstrates Bill's obsessive control.
      • Player: This patent demonstrates Bill's need to control his company and employees. I can't imagine working somewhere where I was so distrusted.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the File 1 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This patent demonstrates Bill's caution in protecting his ideas.
      • Player: This patent demonstrates Bill's caution in protecting his ideas and his business. It shows that he wants to keep a tight, iron grip on his profits.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the File 1 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • What is a patent?
      • Player: Does anyone here know what a patent is? I've heard of patent leather, but that can't be the same thing.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

If defending:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #1: A patent filed by Bill for his Supersteady Plankmaker machine.
    • This patent demonstrates Bill's obsessive control.
      • Player: This patent demonstrates Bill's obsessive control, but he was proven absolutely right by Will's actions! If Bill hadn't put a patent down for the machine, Will would have been free to steal it.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the File 1 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This patent demonstrates Bill's caution in protecting his ideas.
      • Player: This patent demonstrates Bill's caution in protecting his ideas and his business secrets. Any prudent business owner would do the same, or face ruin from industrial spies.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the File 1 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • What is a patent?
      • Player: I have absolutely no idea what a patent is. Are they patients with no eyes?
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

File 2[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #2: A letter from Bill to the estate agent.
  • The Prosecution presents the letter as evidence.
    • This is a letter from one friend to another.
      • Player: This is a letter from one friend to another. We really shouldn't read it, since that would be a breach of privacy.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This letter doesn't prove any underhanded dealings.
      • Player: This letter doesn't prove any underhanded dealings. But it does show is that both the estate agent and Bill will do anything for a profit, right?
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the File 2 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This letter proves that there were underhanded dealings.
      • Player: This letter proves that Bill and the estate agent conspired to prevent Will from competing. The concern about trade secrets covers up a blatant disregard for fair-trade laws. Bill doesn't seem too bothered about forcing the estate agent to sharing HIS trade secrets.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the File 2 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

If defending:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #2: A letter from Bill to the estate agent.
    • This is a letter from one friend to another.
      • Player: This is a letter from one friend to another. It's private and reveals nothing that contributes to the Prosecution or Defence's case. We should really ignore it.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This letter doesn't prove any underhanded dealings.
      • Player: This letter doesn't disclose any underhanded dealings at all. It's vague about the kind of action that Bill plans to take, and shows, if anything, that Bill was right to be concerned about his apprentice.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the File 2 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This letter proves that there were underhanded dealings.
      • Player: This letter may look underhand and unfair, but it doesn't contain anything illegal. It's just two friends organising the downfall of a young businessman, that's all.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the File 2 before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

Cross-examination[edit | edit source]

Bill - sawmill owner[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • Can you tell me about your sawmill business?
      • Player: Can you tell me about your sawmill business?
      • Sawmill Operator: I started it about three years ago. There was a gap in the market for high quality building supplies and the like, so I bought up some cheap, barren land and built the only lumberyard in RuneScape. At the start it was just me, but we've already upsized to three workers and the odd work placement.
      • Player: Are you making a decent profit?
      • Sawmill Operator: We keep expanding! We opened one sawmill to the public recently, and plan to add to our workforce in the future. There was a time when I would worry about the Grand Exchange, but that time's gone.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Will, your worker?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Will, your worker?
      • Sawmill Operator: I took Will on as a favour to a friend, as I'd heard word that he was a bit of a troublemaker. Over the years, he's calmed down and become the best sawmill worker in the mill, no doubt about that. But I trained him, and I invested in him. Whatever happened to loyalty?
      • Player: Did you try talking to him about it?
      • Sawmill Operator: I did, but he'd already made his mind up. I got so angry that I could barely speak. I've tried to speak to him since then, but he's refused to communicate.
      • Player: Oh. Well, that's actually quite...diplomatic of you.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Bill before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
      • Player: Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
      • Sawmill Operator: Looky here, I know what you are trying to get me to say! I tried to stop him from opening his own business, but for good reason. He knew everything about the lumberyard: our wholesale contacts, the workings of our machinery, even our profit margins. He could undercut the lumberyard with very little effort.
      • Player: That doesn't give you the right to push him out of the business altogether!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Bill before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • Can you tell me about your sawmill business?
      • Player: Can you tell me about your sawmill business?
      • Sawmill Operator: The sawmill opened three years ago, after I invested my savings in a plot of land just outside Varrock. I'd had trouble building my own house, as there didn't seem to be anywhere to buy the materials, so I decided to plug the gap in the market myself. Now we've got three workers and the occasional work placement.
      • Player: I imagine you're making a tidy profit from being the only lumberyard in the area.
      • Sawmill Operator: That's right! No one can compete with my prices or efficiency. I was a bit worried when the Grand Exchange opened, but sales haven't slowed down one bit!
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Will, your worker?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Will, your worker?
      • Sawmill Operator: Will was in and out of jail when I took him on, but I saw potential in him. Having trained him up, invested so much time in him, he's setting himself up in direct competition and even taking me to court. I just don't understand it. Whatever happened to loyalty?
      • Player: Did you try talking to him about it?
      • Sawmill Operator: I did, but he didn't want to hear a word. He just casually informed me that he was setting himself up in direct competition. That's when I decided to act!
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Bill before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
      • Player: Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
      • Sawmill Operator: I did. I know how that sounds - and I do welcome the competition - but I have invested so much time and money in Will, and let him in on so many company secrets. He would create unfair competition.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Bill before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Will - sawmill worker[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • Did you help Bill build his Supersteady Plankmaking machine?
      • Player: Did you help Bill build his Supersteady Plankmaking machine?
      • Will: Help him? I designed it! He invested in the materials and I constructed it.
      • Player: Were you planning to use the same machine in your own business?
      • Will: That was the plan. It's my baby, right? I can do what I want with it.
      • Player: That's not how it works, Will. I want you to win this case, but you can't go breaking the law.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Will before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was it like working at the mill?
      • Player: What was it like working at the mill?
      • Will: It was great at first. Bill knew about my past, but saw through it and trained me up anyway. The problems came about once I'd outgrown the lumberyard. They would rely on me to come up with new technology and finish the custom jobs.
      • Player: What about your co-workers? How do you like them?
      • Will: Oh, Phil and Jill are okay. We've had some good times, but they're happy where they are. I need to move onward and upward.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Could you tell me about trying to start your own business?
      • Player: Could you tell me about trying to start your own business?
      • Will: It soon became clear that the business was relying on me more and more. I created the prototypes for all our machines, I came up with the idea to get adventurers in to make custom planks, and I was doing the majority of work. It was time for me to move on, and use that expertise for myself. As soon as I'd bid on a plot of land, though, I'd find that I was quickly outbid. It didn't take a genius to figure out that Bill was sabotaging my attempts, so I had no choice but to take him to court.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Will before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • Did you help Bill build his Supersteady Plankmaking machine?
      • Player: Did you help Bill build his Supersteady Plankmaker machine?
      • Will: I did more than help him: I designed and built the thing!
      • Player: Were you planning on using the same or similar machine in your own business?
      • Will: Uh, yeah. Why?
      • Player: You'd be breaking the law, Will. Bill owns the patent to it, and if you used the machine, you'd be liable for prosecution.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Will before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was it like working at the mill?
      • Player: What was it like working at the mill?
      • Will: At first, it was great. Credit should go to Bill for sticking with me, but I soon outgrew the lumberyard and wanted to make money for myself.
      • Player: What about your co-workers? How do you like them?
      • Will: Oh, Phil and Jill are okay. They don't have the grand dreams that I have, and they're happy to work for a pittance.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Could you tell me about trying to start your own business?
      • Player: Could you tell me about trying to start your own business?
      • Will: A year ago, I approached Bill about a wage increase. We both knew that I was keeping the yard together and increasing profits, so I felt I should get a portion of that. When he didn't even offer me a penny, I decided that the time had come to set my own business up. The rest you know: I would place a bid for a suitable plot of land and get quickly outbid. When the estate agent revealed that Bill was behind it, I took him to court. So here we are.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Will before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Estate Agent[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • You were finding land for Will, right?
      • Player: You were finding land for Will, weren't you?
      • Estate Agent: Yes, Will was using my services to find a good location for his new business.
      • Player: So, what happened?
      • Estate Agent: Well, Bill happens to be a good friend of mine, so I let him know his worker was planning to set up in direct competition. Bill flew into a fury, and demanded that I let him know about any plot of land that Will bid on.
      • Player: How could you agree to that? That's underhanded business tactics.
      • Estate Agent: As I said, Bill's a good friend. Plus, my business relies on him being successful, so it's best to keep on good terms with each other.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the estate agent before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Bill's business?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Bill's business?
      • Estate Agent The lumberyard was built on one of the first plots that I ever sold, and Bill and I have been firm friends since. It was a good match, since I was selling plots of land and he was selling the tools to improve them. He is a solid, dependable man who believes strongly in loyalty.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the estate agent before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Bill and Will?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Bill and Will?
      • Estate Agent: They were like father and son. That's why Bill felt so betrayed by Will's actions; it felt like his own child had stabbed him in the back.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • You were finding land for Will, right?
      • Player: You were finding land for Will, weren't you?
      • Estate Agent: Yes, Will came to me with money and details of the kind of land he was looking for.
      • Player: So, what happened?
      • Estate Agent: Being friends with Bill, I had to let him know that Will was setting up in direct competition. Bill got angry and demanded that I inform him of any bids that were made.
      • Player: You didn't agree to that, did you?
      • Estate Agent: I had to! Bill is the only source of planks and building materials in the area.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the estate agent before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Bill's business?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Bill's business?
      • Estate Agent Bill started out around the same time as me, and we've been firm friends since then. We look out for each other, and let each other know if there's anything that could damage our businesses. I can't think of anyone more reliable and loyal.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the estate agent before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What can you tell me about Bill and Will?
      • Player: What can you tell me about Bill and Will?
      • Estate Agent: They were like family, and it was great to see them work together. What surprised me was that Will didn't talk to Bill about the separation: he just went ahead and did it. That's very bad for business.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Talking to the prosecutor[edit | edit source]

Only if defending

Talking to the defender[edit | edit source]

Only if prosecuting

All evidence presented[edit | edit source]

If the player has received one positive or negative jury response for each piece of evidence:

All evidence presented and witnesses interviewed[edit | edit source]

If the player has received one positive or negative jury response for each piece of evidence and each witness:

  • Judge: I think that is enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Which member of the Jury would you like to try to appeal to?
  • Opens Jury selection interface.
  • If prosecuting:
    • If the player made enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented evidence that conclusively proves the Defendant prevented a genuine attempt to provide some competition. We can't allow corporations of this size to choose who they compete against. It's not fair to the people of Gielinor that they can only receive planks from one man and his inflated prices. Competition must be allowed to grow and prosper.
    • If the player did not make enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, the Defendant has made it impossible for a competitor to become successful. Without competition, the Defendant could raise the price of planks exponentially. It's not fair to the people of RuneScape that they can only receive planks from one man and his inflated prices. Competition must be allowed to grow and prosper.
    • Judge: Very well. Now, the Defence may present their case.
    • (Same as 'The defence's case: Full case' below.)
  • If defending:
    • If the player made enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, the Defendant has acted in an appropriate and legal manner in an effort to protect his business. Businesses become successful by having an edge over their competition. If we allow the theft of trade secrets, then companies will always be at risk of losing that 'edge' to their opponents.
    • If the player did not make enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, Will was threatening to sell cheaper planks. Bill had to stop this kind of practice before it started costing him money. It's hard for a citizen to relate to, but this man's business was in danger. He should be able to do everything in his power to end that danger.
  • (Same as Transcript:Court Cases § Pronouncing verdict.)

The prosecution's case[edit | edit source]

Only if defending:

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Prosecutor: My case rests on these points: Bill filed a patent, even before Will left, demonstrating his obsessive control and paranoia. Also, I presented a letter that proves Bill and the estate agent conspired against Will to prevent competition. I called Bill to the stand and asked him outright if he had tried to stop Will opening a competing business. He said I then called the estate agent. He confirmed he and Bill conspired to prevent Will from buying land.

Full case[edit | edit source]

  • Prosecutor: Members of the Jury, I am going to present you with evidence that decisively proves that Bill, the sawmill owner, monopolised the lumber industry and actively prevented any competition. Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #1: A patent filed by Bill for his Supersteady Plankmaker machine.
  • The Prosecution presents the patent as evidence.
  • Prosecutor: This patent demonstrates Bill's obsessive control over his company and employees. He was clearly distrustful, even before Will considered leaving. Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #2: A letter from Bill to the estate agent.
  • The Prosecution presents the letter as evidence.
  • Prosecutor: This letter proves that Bill and the estate agent conspired against Will, preventing him from opening a rival business. This highlights a blatant disregard for fair-trade laws. The Prosecution calls Bill.
  • Bill is called to the stand.
  • Prosecutor: Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
  • Sawmill Operator: Yes, I did. Not to prevent competition, I'll have you know; I welcome a challenge. I prevented him because he's stealing trade secrets. He learned everything he knows from me and my mill and, now, he's taking those secrets to start his own business. That's not competition: it's theft!
  • Prosecutor: But, rather than discuss it with him, you went behind his back and prevented him from buying land.
  • Sawmill Operator: It's the only way to get through to him. He won't listen to reason.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the prosecutor.
  • Prosecutor: The Prosecution calls the estate agent.
  • Bill leaves the stand. The estate agent is called to the stand.
  • Prosecutor: You were finding land for Will, weren't you?
  • Estate Agent: Yes, Will was using my services to find the optimum location for his new business.
  • Prosecutor: So, what happened?
  • Estate Agent: Well, Bill is a good friend of mine. I thought it was odd that Will was looking for land, and I mentioned it to Bill, who went berserk! He insisted that I tell him about Will's purchase and let Bill have first bid on the land.
  • Prosecutor: You agreed to that?
  • Estate Agent: Of course! Not only is Bill a friend, but he could put me out of business if he cuts his supply of planks.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the prosecutor.
  • Judge: I think that will be enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • Prosecutor: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented evidence that conclusively proves the Defendant has acted illegally by trying to create a monopoly within the plank trade.
  • The estate agent leaves the stand.
  • Prosecutor: Will has a right to offer consumers a choice of plank supplier, so they can benefit from competitive prices.
  • (Dialogue ends.)

The defence's case[edit | edit source]

Only if prosecuting:

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Defender: My case rests on these points: The patent filed by Bill is a sensible and normal thing to do. It demonstrates his keen business sense. Also, the letter between Bill and the estate agent is vague. If anything it proves that Bill was right to be concerned about Will stealing his ideas. I called Bill to the stand and asked him about preventing Will from opening a competing business. It's clear that Will was going to steal the technology Bill relies on to thrive. That's hardly competition, it's theft! I then called Will. I asked him about his history with Bill. Will used to get in trouble, until Bill took him under his wing. Now Will is making trouble again!

Full case[edit | edit source]

  • Defender: Members of the Jury, I am going to present evidence that decisively proves that Bill was protecting company's secrets by denying Will the chance to open another mill. Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #1: A patent filed by Bill for his Supersteady Plankmaker machine. This patent demonstrates Bill's caution when protecting his ideas and business. Any prudent businessman would do the same, or face ruin from industrial espionage.
  • Defender: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #2: A letter from Bill to the estate agent. This letter doesn't disclose any underhanded dealings at all. It's vague about the kind of action that Bill plans to take, and shows, if anything, that Bill was right to be concerned about his apprentice.
  • Defender: The Defence calls Bill.
  • Bill is called to the stand.
  • Defender: Did you try to stop Will from opening his own business?
  • Sawmill operator: Yes, I did! Not to prevent competition, though. I simply prevented him from stealing trade secrets. Will learned everything he knows from me and my mill, and now he's taking those secrets to start his own business. That's not competition: that's theft!
  • Defender: You were just trying to protect the trade secrets that your business relies on to function.
  • Sawmill operator: Yes. Without those trade secrets, my business wouldn't be able to stand up to new competition. We need them to survive.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the defender.
  • Defender: The Defence calls Will.
  • Bill leaves the stand. Will is called to the stand.
  • Defender: What can you tell me about Bill?
  • Will: Bill was great. He took me in when I was a kid and trained me up. I'd been a bit of a troublemaker before that, and he straightened me out.
  • Defender: So, you have a history of making trouble?
  • Will: That's not what I meant. I made trouble as a kid, but now I just want to start my own business.
  • Defender: But that makes trouble for Bill!
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the defender.
  • Judge: I think that will be enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • Defender: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented evidence that conclusively proves the Defendant is innocent with regard to these crimes.
  • Will leaves the stand.
  • Defender: For businesses to succeed, we have to protect our ideas and trade secrets. Without doing that, we encourage employees to steal and ruin their employers.
  • (Same as Transcript:Court Cases § Pronouncing verdict.)

See also[edit | edit source]