Transcript of River troll v. The People

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This transcript involves dialogue with Clerk, Judge, Prosecutor, Defender, The Jury, River troll, and the player.

Court documents[edit | edit source]

Court summons[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Court summons (River troll v. The People).

Court summons
You have been summoned to the Seers' Village courthouse to work on the case of River troll vs The People.

Please present yourself to the court clerk at your earliest convenience.

Character background[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 1 (River troll v. The People).

Character Background
Suspect: River Troll
Background: The river troll is highly territorial, like most trolls. He is protective of what he considers to be his home, and generally defaults to violence when resolving problems.

Victim(s): Catherby residents
Background: Catherby is the most popular fishing location in the world. This river troll has made Catherby its home, and the residents are tired of cleaning up the mess.

There is no need to interview witnesses in preparation for this case.

Circumstances and evidence[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 2 (River troll v. The People).

Circumstances and Evidence
Suspect: River Troll
Case Background: Reports were received from the Catherby Constabulary about fishermen being disturbed by whirlpools, and sightings of a violent river troll. No one was hurt, but the beach was strewn with trash. On arrest, the following articles were found near the river troll:
1 Raw tuna
1 Half-key
3 Spinach rolls

There is no need to interview witnesses in preparation for this case.

Pre-trial[edit | edit source]

Starting the case[edit | edit source]

Talking to the Clerk about the Court summons[edit | edit source]

Searching the File cabinet[edit | edit source]

Talking to the River troll[edit | edit source]

  • River troll: I dunno what the problem is
  • (Dialogue ends.)

Enter the court room[edit | edit source]

Trial[edit | edit source]

Commencement[edit | edit source]

Opening statement[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

If defending:

Talking to the judge[edit | edit source]

  • Judge: What can I do for you?
    • Your Honour, could you explain what I need to do?
    • Your Honour, I'd like to present evidence.
    • Your Honour, I'd like to call a witness.
      • Player: Your Honour, I would like to call a witness.
        • Choose your witness:
          • River troll.
          • Arresting officer.
          • No one at this time. I would like to present physical evidence.
          • No one at this time. I would like to finish and summarise my case.
            • Player: No one at this time, Your Honour. I would like to finish my presentation by summarising my case to the Jury.
            • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)
    • Your Honour, I'd like to summarise my case.
      • Player: Your Honour, I would like to finish by summarising my case to the Jury.
      • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)

Presenting evidence[edit | edit source]

Raw fish[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #1: A raw fish.
  • The Prosecution presents a raw fish as evidence.
    • The accused was found eating this fish.
      • Player: The accused was found eating this fish. You can imagine what happens next: it finishes the fish, chucks it over its shoulder and then munches on another one.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • It's a smelly fish.
      • Player: This is a very smelly fish. I wouldn't eat it, I think it's gone off. Trolls have no sense of smell - that's a fact - so it must be the troll's.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the raw fish before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This was one of the several fish found at the scene of the crime.
      • Player: This was one of several fish found at the scene of the crime. They were strewn about in a messy manner, and the river troll was munching on them and littering the beach with its dinner, with little or no regard for the community.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the raw fish before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

If defending:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #1: A raw fish.
  • The Prosecution presents a raw fish as evidence.
    • The accused was found eating this fish.
      • Player: The accuesd was found eating this fish. It's not entirely surprising, it's a river troll after all, and fish wash up on the shore all the time. Some adventurers even drop fish just to make room in their backpack. Do I see them in the courtroom today? Of course not, and this river troll could just as easily have been disposing of their litter, rather than making its own.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the raw fish before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • It's a smelly fish.
      • Player: It's a smelly fish. You'd have to be some kind of monster to eat this. Uh, except the Defendant, who is a monster of the very highest calibre!
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the raw fish before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • Oh gosh, a fish found on the beach. What a shocker!
      • Player: Oh gosh, a fish found near the sea? What a shocker! Really, can this be used as evidence of littering?
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

Spinach rolls[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #2: Spinach rolls.
  • The Prosecution presents some spinach rolls as evidence.
    • These were found next to the suspect.
      • Player: These spinach rolls were found near the suspect when he was arrested. They're soggy and smell of rotting spinach. Would you appreciate getting a whiff of these during a stroll along the beach?
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the raw fish before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • These are not a common food for trolls.
      • Player: Spinach rolls aren't commonly eaten by trolls. What can we assume, then? This is a troll that will eat anything at all, without discrimination. It might even eat your cats or pet rocks.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the raw fish before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • Ick...spinach.
      • Player: Ick...spinach. Why would anyone eat this?
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

If defending:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #2: Spinach rolls.
  • The Prosecution presents some spinach rolls as evidence.
    • This was found next to the troll.
      • Player: The spinach rolls were found next to my client when it was arrested. That doesn't mean he was littering; his troll nostrils may have found the spinach roll-smell quite enticing. Who can tell?
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the spinach rolls before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This is not a common food for trolls.
      • Player: Spinach rolls aren't eaten by trolls, as they're carnivores. It seems highly unlikely that this was dropped by my client.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the spinach rolls before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • Ick...spinach.

Half-key[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #3: A half-key.
  • The Prosecution presents a half-key as evidence.
    • It's a half of a key.
      • Player: It's half of a key. This could be the key to even more mess on the beaches of Catherby, and more hassle for its citizens.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the half-key before:
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This is yet more junk dropped on the beach.
      • Player: This is an example of yet more junk dropped on the beach. Since it was found near to the troll, it is very likely that it was dropped by it.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the half-key before:
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This was found near the river troll.
      • Player: The half-key was found near to the river troll when it was arrested. I can't think of a reason for a troll to own a half-key, but that makes me all the more suspicious.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

If defending:

  • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen, if I could draw your attention to Prosecution Evidence #3: A half-key.
  • The Prosecution presents a half-key as evidence.
    • It's just half of a key.
      • Player: It's just half a key. It's about as useful as half a spade, half an idea or half-told joke. What use could a troll have with it?
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • Yet more junk dropped on the beach.
      • Player: This is just an example of junk dropped on the beach. Since the Prosecution has failed to pin any of the other litter on my client, why should this half-key be any different?
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the half-key before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)
    • This was found next to the river troll.
      • Player: The half-key was found next to the river troll when it was arrested. I repeat, the key was NEXT to the river troll, not in the troll's possession. What would a troll want with a key, anyway? River trolls live under bridges and eat goats. This can only have been dropped by the hundreds of adventurers who use Catherby as a thoroughfare.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the half-key before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Proceed to 'What evidence do you want to present?' above.)

Cross-examination[edit | edit source]

River troll[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • Littering.
      • Player: Do you know why you're on trial?
      • River troll: Der hoomans fink I too messy.
      • Player: Do you sometimes leave your belongings behind you?
      • River troll: Uh, guess so. I get distracted by fishies an' dem shiny boxes.
      • Player: Aha! The river troll admits to littering!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the river troll before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Catherby.
      • Player: Why do you hang around Catherby?
      • River troll: Cath'by my home. De nasty hoomans come in wiv der pointy sticks and annoy me.
      • Player: Couldn't you talk to the 'hoomans' and reason with them?
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the river troll before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • The fishes.
      • Player: Why do you sometimes harass fishermen?
      • River troll: De fishmen is stealin' my fishes! Der fishes are in my home and dey are mine.
      • Player: What makes you think that they are yours?
      • River troll: What is in my home is mine. When I go in hooman homes, they hit me wiv sticks when I take their food.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • Littering.
      • Player: Do you know why you're on trial?
      • River troll: Der hoomans fink I too messy.
      • Player: But you aren't messy, are you?
      • River troll: Uh, is messy when you leave lots of fish an' stuff about?
      • Player: Yeeees.
      • River troll: Then yes, I is very messy.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the river troll before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Catherby.
      • Player: Why do you hang around Catherby?
      • River troll: Cath'by my home. De nasty hoomans come in wiv der pointy sticks and annoy me.
      • Player: Then you are just attempting to defend your home?
      • River troll: Dat's right.
      • Player: I think the Members of the Jury would surely agree: if someone came into your home with pointy sticks, you would behave in a similar manner!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the river troll before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • The fishes.
      • Player: Why do you sometimes harass fishermen?
      • River troll: Dey is stealin my fhishes! Der fishes are in my home and dey are mine.
      • Player: Er, so you believe the fishermen are stealing from you?
      • River troll: Dat right! Dey is stealin de fishes I eat. Dey take so much I gets big hungry.
      • Player: Can we blame a starving troll for protecting its only food source?
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the river troll before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Arresting officer[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • The arrest.
      • Player: Could you tell me about the arrest?
      • Arresting officer: We 'ad some reports of a disturbance on Catherby beach. So, we went on troll patrol and when we got there, no one was around 'cept this one. It was surrounded by junk, and we'd had reports of it harassin' fishermen. We booked it for littering, since that was the best we could do.
      • Player: Because you saw it dropping some of the trash?
      • Arresting officer: No, the whole beach was covered in junk. It was just sitting near some of it, and it seemed likely that it dropped it.
      • Player: Um, but you didn't see it drop the trash?
      • Arresting officer: Nah
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the arresting officer before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Previous reports.
      • Player: This isn't the first time you've had complaints about the river troll, is it?
      • Arresting officer: No, it isn't. We've had numerous complaints of harassment filed by fishermen, but no proof. This is the first time we have 'ad anything concrete enough to bring it into custody.
      • Player: So, a long-time criminal is finally brought to justice!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the arresting officer before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Catherby.
      • Player: Catherby is a very busy beach isn't it?
      • Arresting officer: The most popular fishing location in the world, so they tell
      • Player: These disturbances must really affect the town's business.
      • Arresting officer: Yeah, definitely. That's why the community was keen to bring the case to court.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the arresting officer before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • The arrest.
      • Player: Could you tell me about the arrest?
      • Arresting officer: We went on patrol on Catherby beach after receiving tips that a troll was being a nuisance in the area. When we got there, no one was around 'cept this one. The troll was surrounded by fish heads and the like, so we booked it for littering. 'Twas the best we could do.
      • Player: But did you see it drop any of the trash?
      • Arresting officer: Nah, the whole beach was covered with junk, it was just sitting near some of it. It seemed likely that it dropped it.
      • Player: But let me make this clear to the Jury: you didn't see it drop the trash?
      • Arresting officer: No.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the arresting officer before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Previous reports.
      • Player: Is this the first time you've had complaints about the river troll?
      • Arresting officer: No, at all. We've had more complaints than you could shake a fishing rod at. This is the first time we've had enought evidence to bring charges against it, though.
      • Player: So, you're framing my client to meet the needs of some territorial fishermen?
      • Arresting officer: No, I don't think you quite understand. We've built a genuine case against your client for littering and disturbing the peace. We don't frame nobody.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about the arresting officer before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Catherby.
      • Player: Catherby is a very busy beach isn't it?
      • Arresting officer: The most popular fishing location in the world, so they tell me. So, yes, it is very busy.
      • Player: In areas with lots of adventurers, there must be a lot of garbage dropped on the ground.
      • Arresting officer: Yeah, I suppose so.
      • Player: Then it's highly likely that the litter wasn't the river troll's! Adventurers simply dumped trash all over its home.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about the arresting officer before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Talking to the prosecutor[edit | edit source]

Only if defending

Talking to the defender[edit | edit source]

Only if prosecuting

All evidence presented[edit | edit source]

If the player has received one positive or negative jury response for each piece of evidence:

All evidence presented and witnesses interviewed[edit | edit source]

If the player has received one positive or negative jury response for each piece of evidence and each witness:

  • Judge: I think that is enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Which member of the Jury would you like to try to appeal to?
  • Opens Jury selection interface
  • If prosecuting:
    • If the player made enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented evidence that conclusively proves the Defendant littered on the beach of Catherby and is a menace to its community. This time he littered in Catherby. What if, next time, it's littering in your schools, your hospitals or your homes?
    • If the player did not make enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have tried very hard to link the Defendant to the crime. This time he littered in Catherby. What if, next time, it's littering in your schools, your hospitals or your homes?
    • Judge: Very well. Now, the Defence may present their case.
    • (Same as 'The defence's case' below.)
  • If defending:
    • If the player made enough correct choices in their case:

adies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented evidence that conclusively proves the Defendant is innocent with regard to these crimes. This troll's home and food source are being invaded on a daily basis. The Prosecution have provide no proof that it was littering at all! It's time we all stopped trolling the troll.

    • If the player did not make enough correct choices in their case:

Ladies and Gentleman of the Jury, I have presented compelling evidence that the Defendant is being framed for these crimes. Just because there was some junk next to him doesn't mean it put it there.

The prosecution's case[edit | edit source]

Only if defending:

  • Prosecutor: Members of the Jury, I am going to present evidence that decisively proves this river troll is a littering menace to the Catherby community. First, I present the spinach rolls. These were found near the suspect when he was arrested. They're soggy and smell of rotting spinach. Would you appreciate getting a whiff of these during a stroll along the beach?
  • The prosecution presents the spinach rolls as evidence.
  • Prosecutor: Second, I present the raw fish. The suspect was munching on this when he was arrested. It's probable he took this from some poor fisherman.
  • The prosecution presents the raw fish as evidence.
  • Prosecutor: The Prosecution calls the arresting officer.
  • The Arresting Officer is called to the stand.
  • Prosecutor: You arrested this river troll, did you not?
  • Arresting Officer: I did. We had reports of a disturbance on the beach. When we arrived it was deserted, 'cept for him.
  • Prosecutor: What was the state of the beach when you arrested the river troll?
  • Arresting Officer: It was a litter-al mess. The troll was sat on a pile of junk, as was listed in the report. It even got fish juice on me uniform! I was fumin'.
  • Prosecutor: The Prosecution calls the river troll.
  • The Arresting Officer leaves the stand. The River troll is called to the stand.
  • Prosecutor: Do you know why you are on trial?
  • River troll: Der hoomans fink I too messy.
  • Prosecutor: Do you sometimes leave your belongings behind you?
  • River troll: Uh, guess so. I get distracted by fishies an' dem shiny boxes.
  • Prosecutor: Aha! The river troll admits to littering!
  • (Dialogue ends.)

The defence's case[edit | edit source]

Only if prosecuting

  • Defender: Members of the Jury, I am going to present you with evidence that decisively proves this river troll is innocent. The Prosecution has presented the raw fish as evidence of littering. My client was found eating this fish. It's not entirely surprising - he is a river troll after all - and fish wash up on the shore all the time. Some adventurers even drop fish just to make room in their backpack. Do I see them in the courtroom today? Of course not, and this river troll could just as easily have been disposing of their litter, rather than making its own. To respond to the evidence presented in the form of spinach rolls. Spinach rolls are not commonly eaten by river trolls. As you'd expect from their name, river trolls prefer to scout rivers for fish, eels and other slimy creatures. In short, they are carnivores and hate the taste of spinach. The half-key evidence presented by the Prosecution doesn't stand up to scrutiny. The half-key was found next to the river troll when it was arrested. I repeat, the key was NEXT to the troll, not in the troll's possession. What would a troll want with a key, anyway? River trolls live under bridges and eat goats. This can only have been dropped by the hundreds of adventurers who use Catherby as a thoroughfare. The Defence calls the river troll.
  • The River troll is called to the stand.
  • Defender: Why do you hang about Catherby?
  • River troll: Cath'by my home. De nasty hoomans come in wiv pointy sticks and annoy me.
  • Defender: Then you are just defending your home?
  • River troll: Dat's right.
  • Defender: I think you would surely agree: if someone came into your home with pointy sticks, you would behave in a corresponding manner.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the defender's argument.
  • Defender: The Defence calls the arresting officer
  • The River troll leaves the stand. The Arresting Officer is called to the stand.
  • Defender: Catherby is a very busy beach isn't it?
  • Arresting officer: The most popular fishing location in the world, an' we're proud of it!
  • Defender: In areas with lots of adventurers, there must be a lot of garbage dropped on the ground.
  • Arresting officer: Yeah, I suppose so.
  • Defender: Then it's highly likely that the litter wasn't the river troll's! Humans just dumped trash all over the troll's home.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the defender's argument.
  • Judge: I think that's enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • Defender: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented evidence that conclusively proves the Defendant is innocent with regard to these crimes. My client's home is invaded on a daily basis by fishermen and women.
  • The Arresting Officer leaves the stand.
  • Defender: This river troll is simply defending its food source and home; if any littering is being done, it's being done by the hundreds of people who visit Catherby. It's time to stop trolling the troll.
  • (Same as Transcript:Court Cases § Pronouncing verdict.)

See also[edit | edit source]