Dialogue for Merchant (Polypore Dungeon)

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Dialogue[edit | edit source]

  • Merchant: It's a young lady. Perhaps it wants to trade with us. Or perhaps it needs us to look after its spores and flakes.
  • What would you like to say?
    • I have a question for you.
      • Player: I have a question for you.
      • What would you like to say?
        • Who are you?
          • Player: Who are you?
          • Merchant: It wants to know about us, does it? It's a nosey little lady, we thinks. But we shall answer it. We used to live in a house, a little house in a warm land, just us and Darling. Yes, we had Darling then, with her soft hair, silken tresses on the pillow... so long ago. We lived in our house, and the sun shone, and every day Darling would sing as she cooked and cleaned. We made pretty things to sell to the gentlefolk, and Darling loved the pretty things, and we loved Darling. Then there was no more Darling - the doctor tried everything - so no more silken tresses, no more singing... just the empty house. We left; we walked through days and nights and sun and rain. Then we found this place, and we met Ladyship. Ladyship makes pretty things too. Folks come to see them, and we trade with the folks. We sell them clothes made by the Ladyship; she lets us.
          • What would you like to say?
        • What is this place?
          • Player: What is this place?
          • Merchant: It doesn't know where it is, silly little lady. We shall tell it. This is Ladyship's garden. Ladyship came from a long way away. Ladyship is clever; she makes the flowers grow. Once there were ugly beasts here, but Ladyship grew her flowers all over the beasts to make them beautiful. Now they are her pets. Folks came to see the pretty things Ladyship makes. Ladyship doesn't mind; she likes it when folks play with her pets.
          • What would you like to say?
        • Tell me about the things you sell.
          • Player: Tell me about the things you sell.
          • Merchant: It wants to know about Ladyship's clever clothes. We hope it will buy things afterwards. Ladyship makes clothes out of webs of mycelium, taken from her flowers. Wizards can wear Ladyship's clothes to help their magicks. If we gather flakes from Ladyship's pets, we can sew them onto Ladyship's clothes to give them more of her power - lots more power. The best flakes come from Ladyship's strongest pets, but they're tricky to fight; very tricky indeed. Not many folks can touch them. Also, the flakes fall off the clothes after a while, so folks come back to get more flakes from Ladyship's pets.
          • What would you like to say?
        • Can I buy your costume?
          • Player: Can I buy your costume?
          • Merchant: The young lady wants to buy are clothes. If we sell it our clothes, we'll be naked. Ladyship doesn't like it when we're naked; she said so. We'd better tell the young lady it can't have our clothes, not at any price.
          • Player: Fair enough!
          • What would you like to say?
        • Okay, I've finished asking questions.
          • Player: Okay, I've finished asking questions.
          • Merchant: Perhaps the young lady would like to trade now. Or we can look after its spores and flakes if it wishes.
          • What would you like to say?
            • I'd like to trade.
            • I need you to look after something.
            • I think I'll leave you alone!
    • I'd like to trade.
    • I need you to look after something.
      • Player: I need you to look after something.
      • (Fungal Storage interface opens.)
      • (Dialogue ends)
    • I think I'll leave you alone!
      • Player: I think I'll leave you alone!
      • Merchant: It's going to leave us alone. But we're not alone, are we?
      • (Dialogue ends)