Dialogue for Maria Gunnars

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This transcript involves dialogue with Maria Gunnars and the player.

In Rellekka[edit | edit source]

Before The Fremennik Trials[edit | edit source]

  • Maria Gunnars: I do not speak to outlanders. Maybe you should speak with Rellekka's Chieftain.

After The Fremennik Trials[edit | edit source]

  • Maria Gunnars: Welcome back, (Player Fremennik name). Do you have any questions?
    • Player: Tell me about Neitiznot's geography.
      • Player: Tell me about Neitiznot's geography.
      • Maria Gunnars: Sure.
      • Mord: Well, as I have mentioned, I am from an island called Jatizso, while my wife is from another island called Neitiznot. Neitiznot is a far less sophisticated and successful island which will not see reason with Jatizso.
      • Maria Gunnars: Ne it iz not!
      • Mord: Ja it iz so!
      • Maria Gunnars: Ahem, anyway, the islands are in a small volcanic archipelago north of here.
      • Maria Gunnars: Along with the main isles there are numerous small islands and a frozen northern island that was recently overrun by trolls.
      • Mord: Jatizso is rich in minerals, and trades extensively, while Neitiznot has stolen all the decent arable land.
      • Maria Gunnars: Only because Jatizso hogs all the wealth.
      • Mord: Well, that wealth is needed to buy the food from Neitiznot at extortionate rates!
      • Maria Gunnars: Only because Jatizso hogs all the wealth!
      • Mord: Ok Maria, stop that!
      • Maria Gunnars: Ok dear!
      • Mord: Thank you!
      • Maria Gunnars: Where was I? Yup, that covers the layout of the islands.
    • Player:Tell me about the islands' history.
      • Player: Tell me about the islands' history.
      • Player: Tell me more about Jatizso.
      • Mord Gunnars: Well now, the history of the isles is a bloody tale. When told in its intended form it takes 9 days and 9 nights. However, I will give you the abridged version.
      • Player: Phew!
      • Mord Gunnars: Four generations ago there was a mighty king who ruled wisely and was loved by all.
      • Mord Gunnars: He had many sons, most of whom proved themselves in the usual Fremennik ways of fighting, sailing, drinking and so on.
      • Mord Gunnars: His youngest two sons, however, were a problem. Ever since they were old enough to hit one another they had bickered and fought.
      • Maria Gunnars: Their names were Jatizso and Neitiznot.
      • Mord Gunnars: Hey! Who's telling this story?
      • Mord Gunnars: Ahem. At the time it was customary for the Kings' sons to claim a prize from his treasury when they came of age.
      • Mord Gunnars: Each brother rallied support and strode out to confront the other on the field of battle to claim the same prize.
      • Mord Gunnars: The brothers met on the field, limbs were bruised, bones were crushed and heads clashed.
      • Maria Gunnars: They probably didn't notice the head-clashing bit. Too thick skulled!
      • Mord Gunnars: Can I finish the story without interruptions?
      • Maria Gunnars: Carry on dear.
      • Mord Gunnars: Anyway, long into the night they fought, until they stood alone, facing each other.
      • Mord Gunnars: On the second day the old king, whose patience was exhausted, strode out onto the field and demanded to know who had claimed his prize.
      • Mord Gunnars: Jatizso looked at his father and told him yes, it was his, to which the other called out 'No! It's not'.
      • Mord Gunnars: And so, the argument continued through to the third day, with the sounds of 'Jah! 'tis so!', 'Ne! It's not!' echoing over the field, becoming more hoarse as the darkness enveloped the brothers.
      • Maria Gunnars: Bah! What they needed was a good clip round the ear.
      • Mord Gunnars: At the end of the third day, when the brothers lay unable to move, let alone stand, the King stood between them in shame.
      • Mord Gunnars: As punishment for their squabbling he banished his sons from his realm, ordering that neither should return until they had conquered lands of their own.
      • Mord Gunnars: Jatizso set sail with a band of loyal followers, sailing into the east, while Neitiznot went west.
      • Mord Gunnars: Jatizso ventured far into uncharted oceans, his crew dwindling as the trials of sailing and sea monsters took them.
      • Mord Gunnars: Jatizso's ship limped through the frozen wastes, in need of repairs, fighting off pirates who thought them easy pickings.
      • Mord Gunnars: At last a promising land was sighted, a land rich in minerals, deep fjords and sweeping mountains.
      • Mord Gunnars: Jatizso claimed the land and named it after himself.
      • Mord Gunnars: A mighty citadel was constructed to protect his land; then Jatizso set forth to explore his new kingdom.
      • Mord Gunnars: Crossing a few fjords, Jatizso spied an island which remained green and fertile, even at such latitude.
      • Mord Gunnars: With a mighty cheer Jatizso and his men marched on the island. Upon reaching the island, however, they discovered a wooden stockade.
      • Mord Gunnars: Determined to be master of all the land, Jatizso stood in front of the gates. He looked up and demanded that those within the stockade surrendered.
      • Mord Gunnars: Jatizso was horrified when his brother appeared on the battlements and cried 'This is my land! Go find yer own'. To which his brother replied 'No it's not!', throwing some rocks for good measure.
      • Mord Gunnars: And so the blood feud continued.
      • Mord Gunnars: The fighting between the towns has continued for generations with little sign of improvement.
      • Mord Gunnars: Quite recently a massive troll army seized one of the islands to the north, while our townships' militias were busy fighting one another.
      • Mord Gunnars: They marched down and razed Neitiznot to the ground while Neitiznot's troops laid siege to Jatizso.
      • Maria Gunnars: The smoke damage was atrocious, I had to replace my entire wardrobe.
      • Mord Gunnars: Yes, dear.
      • Mord Gunnars: Anyway, a hasty sort of peace has been agreed until the trolls are dealt with.
      • Mord Gunnars: But you can still see the bitter rivalry as guards hurl insults between the towns.
    • Player: Tell me about Burgher Mawnis Burowgar.
      • Player: Tell me about Burgher Mawnis Burowgar.
      • Maria Gunnars: Well Burgher Mawnis Burowgar is a gentle soul at heart. His kinsfolk are happy and content with their lot.
      • Mord: 'Soft' is the word we use in Jatizso.
      • Maria Gunnars: Well a soft Burgher is better than a stupid King.
      • Maria Gunnars: Anyway, there was a time when Burgher Burowgar was similar to King Sorvott.
      • Maria Gunnars: Argumentative, short tempered; I am sure you know what I mean.
      • Maria Gunnars: The change happened when the trolls came and razed Neitiznot to the ground.
      • Mord: You mean while Neitiznot's militias were assaulting Jatizso.
      • Maria Gunnars: Yes, well our tribes have been at war for nearly four generations now.
      • Maria Gunnars: Anyway, the Burgher lost his wife and youngest son in the trolls' raid and has been a changed man since.
      • Mord: May their journey to our ancestors' halls be swift.
      • Maria Gunnars: Personally, I am much happier with the considerate Burgher we have now.
    • Player: Can you ferry me to Neitiznot?
      • Player: Can you ferry me to Neitiznot?
      • Maria Gunnars: Let's set sail then.
    • Player: I just stopped to say 'hello'.
      • Player: I just stopped by to say hello.
      • Maria Gunnars: Thanks, and good luck with the Burgher's tasks.
      • Player: I may be back later.

In Neitiznot[edit | edit source]

  • Maria Gunnars: Hi, (Player's Fremennik name), you should speak with Burgher Mawnis Burowgar in the main chambers. Do you have any questions?
    • Player: Tell me about your husband.
      • Player: Tell me about your husband.
      • Maria Gunnars: My husband is a typical Fremennik, being both headstrong and brave.
      • Maria Gunnars: We fell in love when we were young, but as there was a war between our isles, we were ordered to stop seeing each other by our parents.
      • Maria Gunnars: This didn't stop Mord climbing the wailing tower, on his side of the channel between our isles, to sing to me every night.
      • Maria Gunnars: After Mord's voice broke, his singing voice was lost, but I still listened to his terrible sonnets each and every night.
      • Maria Gunnars: Until one night there was no singing! Then, far below me, I heard a gentle voice calling my name.
      • Maria Gunnars: Mord had stolen his father's boat to come and fetch me from my prison and from that day forth we have lived in Rellekka.
    • Player: Tell me about Jatizso.
      • Player: Tell me about Jatizso.
      • Maria Gunnars: My husband does not speak of the inhabitants of the isle of Jatizso much.
      • Maria Gunnars: He has little positive to say about his parents, so he chooses not to speak of them in my presence. The only thing I've noticed is that everyone on that island seems very sad...
      • Player: Tell me about King Sorvott IV.
        • Player:Tell me about King Sorvott IV.
        • Maria Gunnars: King Sorvott IV follows in the footsteps of a line of kings who have reigned since Jatizso himself passed away. It is rumoured that the King has no heir and is seeking a bride to bear him children. Given his personality I'm not surprised he hasn't found a bride yet!
      • Player: What were you saying before?
    • Player: Tell me about Neitiznot.
      • Maria Gunnars: To be honest with you, I do not keep up to date with all the goings on here now that I have a home in Rellekka.
      • Maria Gunnars: However, Neitiznot seems a happy place! The Burgher seems a wiser rule than King Sorvott, although I believe he is worried about the trolls at the moment. They seem to be a big threat.
    • Player: Can you ferry me to Rellekka?
      • Player: Can you ferry me to Rellekka?
      • Maria Gunnars: Sure.
    • Player: I have nothing to ask you right now.
      • Player: I have nothing to ask you right now.
      • Maria Gunnars: Fare thee well.