Transcript of Barbarians v. Wizards

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This transcript involves dialogue with Clerk, Judge, Prosecutor, Defender, The Jury, Baba Yaga, Olaf, Entrance Guardian, Barbarian, Wizard, and the player.

Court documents[edit | edit source]

Court summons[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Court summons (Barbarians v. Wizards).

Court summons

You have been summoned to the Seers' Village courthouse to work on the case of Barbarians v. Wizards. Please present yourself to the court clerk at your earliest convenience.

Suspects' Backgrounds[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 1 (Barbarians v. Wizards).

Defendants: The Fremennik
Background: The Fremennik are a nation of disparate tribes, all scattered about the world. Largely, the Fremennik call themselves by the names of their tribe.

Victims: The Wizards
Background: The wizards are those who train their magical ability and use runes to channel these powers. They are based mostly in the Wizards' Tower, the Mage Training Arena and the Wizards' Guild.

Interviews are recommended with the following:
Baba Yaga (Lunar Isle)
Entrance guardian (Mage Training Arena)
Olaf the Bard (Relleka)
Barbarian woman (jail cell)

Wizard (jail cell)

Circumstances and Evidence[edit | edit source]

The following text is transcluded from Transcript:Case report 2 (Barbarians v. Wizards).

Defendants: The Fremennik

Case Background: It is a matter of historical fact that the Fremennik - referred to as barbarians by many mainland peoples - invaded Misthalin and Asgarnia several generations ago. The wizards of these two regions have now banded together to demand reparations from the Fremennik for damages incurred during the invasion, specifically the destruction of the Mage Training Arena.

Pre-Trial[edit | edit source]

Searching the File cabinet[edit | edit source]

Talking to the Barbarian[edit | edit source]

  • Barbarian: I do not like being locked in this cage!
  • Player: It's just until the trial is over. If you answer my questions, the time will go faster.
  • Barbarian: Very well.
  • Ask about:
    • Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Player: Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Barbarian: Ah, that's an easy one. The weak city dwellers were making runes and using them to do magic!
      • Player: What's so wrong with that?
      • Barbarian: You are talking of heresy. Magic is reserved for the gods! Humans have no right to steal the power of the gods by making runes, so our brothers and sisters punished them.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Barbarian: People died, on all sides. Our epic poems and sagas sang of glorious battles and honourable deaths. Once the dust cleared, we had gained the land that I grew up on: the Barbarian Village, as you outsiders call it.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why do you still live on the mainland?
      • Player: Why do you still live on the mainland?
      • Barbarian: Because it is my home. I was born there and, even when I travel far, it is the place I always wish to return to. Is that not the definition of home?
      • Player: Don't you want to live with your people in Rellekka?
      • Barbarian: They may be my people, but the village is my home and the villagers are my family; and, though the city dwellers may be weak, they are not a terrible people.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • I don't have any more questions.
      • Player: I don't have any more questions.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Talking to the Wizard[edit | edit source]

  • Wizard: What do you want?
  • Player: I need to ask you some questions about the case.
  • Wizard: Fine. Anything to get this over with.
  • Ask about:
    • The history of magic.
      • Ask about:
        • What is magic?
          • Player: What is magic?
          • Wizard: What do you mean, 'What is magic?'? Magic is...magic! It has always been and always will be. It's the glue that binds the probable and the improbable in this world together.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
        • How did wizards learn to cast spells?
          • Player: How did wizards learn to cast spells?
          • Wizard: Spells don't just invent themselves, you know? The spells we master are the results of generations of wizards researching and refining their efforts to be added to a tome or spellbook. The physical business of 'casting' comes naturally, as long as you have runes in your hand. You can feel the magic surging through your body, focusing on the runes in your palm.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
        • How did wizards learn to make runes?
          • Player: How did wizards learn to make runes?
          • Wizard: Much of the history has been lost, thanks to the destruction of the Mage Training Arena and the Wizards' Tower. Wizards agree that a people – we are not sure what people – discovered the rune altars and the method of runecrafting, and spread the knowledge to willing students.
          • Player: How did you learn to runecraft?
          • Wizard: Anyone can learn to runecraft. The barbarians damaged the outer parts of the rune temples but failed to destroy them, so the magic areas they lead to can still be used to create runes.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Wizard: Magic was nearly lost to the world! Few wizards were left, making it difficult to train apprentices. Sincerely, the invasion nearly wiped us out.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Do you know any Fremennik?
      • Player: Do you know any Fremennik?
      • Wizard: No! Why would I associate with those barbarians? They'd likely bully me, call me a heretic for using magic.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why are you in jail if you brought the case to court?
      • Player: Why are you in jail if you brought the case to court?
      • Wizard: I'm acting as a witness in the case, but the seers don't offer any accommodation except these cells! It's almost barbaric.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • I don't have any more questions.
      • Player: I don't have any more questions.

Talking to Baba Yaga[edit | edit source]

  • Choose an option:
    • Talk about the man in the bed.
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • Talk about astral runes.
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • Talk about the court case.
      • Ask about:
        • Can you tell me about the early history of the Fremennik?
          • Player: Can you tell me about the early history of the Fremennik?
          • Baba Yaga: Our history is similar to that of any other people. It fluctuates from peace, to war, and then peace again.
          • Player: Can't you tell me more than that?
          • Baba Yaga: I could, but I will not.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • Why did the clans split up?
          • Player: Why did the clans split up? I mean, the Lunar Clan was once Fremennik wasn't it?
          • Baba Yaga: That's true, we were. Do you not remember why we feel animosity towards the Fremennik? You, the great diplomat, should be able to recall.
          • Player: Err, it's because you practiced magic, and the Fremennik were against the use of it. They persecuted your clan and you left to settle here.
          • Baba Yaga: Close, but not quite! It was not because we practiced magic: the Fremennik did that as well. We split because our clan founder discovered runecrafting.
          • Player: The Fremennik discovered runecrafting?
          • Baba Yaga: Ironic, isn't it? Before that moment, runes were believed to be gifts from the gods and precious commodities. Then, the founder of our clan happened upon the essence mine and discovered that we didn't need gods to make runes. It was an empowering but devastating moment. The clan leaders of the Fremennik felt it was an affront to the gods, and runecrafting was deemed blasphemous. Infighting began, and, to save us all from self-destruction, the Lunar Clan left for the Lunar Isle.
          • Player: Why do the Fremennik avoid all kinds of magic now?
          • Baba Yaga: Time smudges the truth. Magic became associated with runecrafting, and it was easier to dismiss the whole than untangle what was right and wrong. So, they've denied a part of themselves and have suffered the consequences.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
          • Player: Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
          • Baba Yaga: I don't really know. We'd split by that point and all communication was cut off. They were certainly headed on that path by the time we left.
          • Player: You must know something about it.
          • Baba Yaga: Before we split from the Fremennik, we spent a deal of time locating the altars and building temples to protect them. When the Lunar Clan left, others will have found our work and begun runecrafting as well. It must have spread a great deal, as the Fremennik decided to stop it, but that's only one theory. There could be many other reasons.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • I don't have any more questions.
          • Player: I don't have any more questions.
          • (Dialogue ends.)
    • Talk about something else.
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)

Talking to the Entrance Guardian[edit | edit source]

  • Player: Hi.
  • Entrance Guardian: Greetings. What wisdom do you seek?
  • Choose an option:
    • I need to talk to you about a court case.
      • Player: I need to know about the barbarian invasion.
      • Ask about:
        • What do you know of the history of magic?
          • Player: What do you know of the history of magic?
          • Entrance Guardian: Hmm...I know that, long ago, runes were given to men so they could protect themselves when the gods left. Once man discovered he could make runes himself, the real study of magic began, so rune guardians were created from rune essence to guard them as they practised magic. Then, the invasion came, and everything was destroyed. Only recently has that knowledge been regained and wizards have been able to resurrect the guardians. We can guard once again.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • Can you tell me about the Mage Training Arena's history?
          • Player: Can you tell me about the Mage Training Arena's history?
          • Entrance Guardian: This is actually the second Mage Training Arena. The first was destroyed in the invasion.
          • Player: Who invaded?
          • Entrance Guardian: I do not remember; my memory from that time is impaired. The wizards tell me the barbarians invaded.
          • Player: So, why was the first arena built?
          • Entrance Guardian: Magic is a dangerous study, so the arenas were built to provide safe haven for those learning magic. We were created to guard the arena and assist those learning magic.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • What do you remember of the invasion?
          • Player: What do you remember of the invasion?
          • Entrance Guardian: Nothing.
          • Player: Not even a little?
          • Entrance Guardian: No. My memory, from before my resurrection, is impaired.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • I don't have any more questions.
          • Player: I don't have any more questions.
          • (Dialogue ends.)
    • Can you tell me about this place again?
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • Can you explain the different portals?
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • About the progress hat...
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • Thanks, bye!
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)

Talking to Olaf the Bard[edit | edit source]

  • Olaf the Bard: Hello again to you, [Fremennik name]. Us bards should stick together, what?
  • Choose an option:
    • I was wondering...
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • I'd like to discuss a case with you.
      • Player: I have some questions about a court case involving Fremennik history.
      • Olaf: Well, I am the one to ask, since I am the keeper of our history.
      • Ask about:
        • What do you know about the splitting of the Fremennik tribes?
          • Player: What do you know about the splitting of the Fremennik tribes?
          • Olaf: Little is written or sung about that part of our history. It was a dark time, when our sisters and brothers came to believe in things that our clan does not believe.
          • Player: What sort of things?
          • Olaf: They wanted to pursue the study of magic and the making of runes. Our clan believes these are blasphemous acts, so, to prevent a civil war, the clan split.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • Can you tell me about the invasion?
          • Player: Can you tell me about the invasion?
          • Olaf: The Great Invasion! A stirring tale! It is all recounted in an epic ballad...
          • Player: The highlights would be fine.
          • Olaf: Of course. The council of the time was led by clever and powerful men. They recognised our strength and looked to increase our holdings by invading others. So, they told our people that the Gods were angry at the use of magic and the heretics must be wiped out for their blasphemous practices.
          • Player: So it wasn't about magic? It was about increasing land holdings?
          • Olaf: It wasn't quite that simple. Very rarely are wars started by one single thing. The hunger for land and the killing of heretics were two of many reasons.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • What was the result of the invasion?
          • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
          • Olaf: The invasion brought great destruction and loss of life. Good things came as a result, too. There was the exchange of ideas and goods, and the opening of communication between different peoples. Many of our people thrived in the lands of the outerlanders.
          • (Shows the previous options.)
        • I don't have any more questions.
          • Player: I don't have any more questions.
          • (Dialogue ends.)
    • I'd like to toggle my lyre port destination.
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)
    • I forget now...
      • (Non-relevant dialogue)

Enter the court room[edit | edit source]

Trial[edit | edit source]

Commencement[edit | edit source]

Opening statement[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Player: Thank you, Your Honour. Members of the Jury, I plan to persuade you that the wizards deserve compensation for the damage and distress caused by the barbarians. I will demonstrate that time does not heal wounds, but reparations will help ease the pain.
  • (Same as 'Choose your witness' below.)

If defending:

Talking to the judge[edit | edit source]

  • Judge: What can I do for you?
    • Your Honour, could you explain what I need to do?
    • Your Honour, I'd like to present evidence.
      • Player: Your Honour, I'd like to present evidence.
      • Judge: There is no evidence to present for this case. You had best stick to calling witnesses.
    • Your Honour, I'd like to call a witness.
      • Player: Your Honour, I'd like to call a witness.
      • Choose your witness:
        • Barbarian. (If interviewed prior the trial)
        • Wizard. (If interviewed prior the trial)
        • Baba Yaga. (If interviewed prior the trial)
        • Entrance guardian. (If interviewed prior the trial)
        • Olaf the Bard. (If interviewed prior the trial)
        • No one at this time. I would like to finish and summarise my case.
          • Player: No one at this time, Your Honour. I would like to finish my presentation by summarising my case to the Jury.
          • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)
    • Your Honour, I'd like to summarise my case.
      • Player: Your Honour, I would like to summarise my case to the Jury.
      • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)

Cross-examination[edit | edit source]

Barbarian[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Player: Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Barbarian: To get to the other side! Haha!
      • Player: This is hardly the time for jokes.
      • Barbarian: Bah! You take this too seriously! Our ancestors invaded because city dwellers were making runes to practise magic.
      • Player: What's so wrong with that?
      • Barbarian: Magic is reserved for the gods! We are not immortal, we are not all-knowing, and we should not attempt to be all- powerful. Magic is a power for gods.
      • Player: Your people nearly wiped out the wizards because their beliefs conflicted with yours? That's completely unjust.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Barbarian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Barbarian: Thousands died, but only the weaker barbarians were among them. The strongest took the land from the dead outerlanders and claimed it as their right. I come from the land they fairly won.
      • Player: Fairly won? You killed thousands and kept the spoils, profiting from them to this day! The wizards deserve compensation for that.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Barbarian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why do you still live on the mainland?
      • Player: Why do you still live on the mainland?
      • Barbarian: It's my home. I was born there, my people are there, and I know the lands about the village like the blade of my axe.
      • Player: Don't you ever get an urge to return to the Fremennik lands to the west?
      • Barbarian: I have visited them, of course, and they are good people, but they are not my people. They are still brothers and sisters, in a distant way, but the village is where my true family makes home.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Player: Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Barbarian: City dwellers, outerlanders, were practising magic and trading runes.
      • Player: I take it they were doing evil things with them?
      • Barbarian: That is right. They were practising magic that was reserved for the gods. They hoped to become godlike by stealing the runes that were not rightfully theirs. So we killed them all; it was our only choice.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Barbarian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Barbarian: A hard-fought victory for the Fremennik, and the death of almost all rune users. Their land was scorched or handed to the most successful chieftains for their tribes to settle on.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Barbarian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why do you still live on the mainland?
      • Player: Why do you still live on the mainland?
      • Barbarian: It is where my heart is. I have friends there, I have the respect of my other clansmen. It seems strange to call it home, but that's what it is.
      • Player: Don't you ever get tempted to return to Rellekka?
      • Barbarian: It's not my home, so why would I? I feel comfortable there, sure, and the people are welcoming and great drinkers, but it is not where I grew up and faced my trials.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Wizard[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • The history of magic.
      • Ask about:
        • What is magic?
          • Player: What is magic?
          • Wizard: How can you answer that? Magic is anything you want it to be, which is its beauty! It is limitless, if you take the time to learn how to control it and use it.
          • The Jury reacts to the argument.
          • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
        • How did wizards learn to cast spells?
          • Player: How did wizards learn to cast spells?
          • Wizard: Casting spells is as natural as drinking or breathing, as long as you hold runes in your palm. The magic flows through you like a river, its course winding to the runes. Knowing what spells to use is a different matter: you need to spend years in study to have complete control over the rune energies.
          • The Jury reacts to the argument.
          • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
        • How did wizards learn to make runes?
          • Player: How did wizards learn to make runes?
          • Wizard: With the death of the wizards went a lot of knowledge, passed down through generations. All we know is that the rune altars were found by a people who were generous enough to spread the knowledge, rather than keep it secret.
          • Player: How did you learn to runecraft?
          • Wizard: Anyone can learn to runecraft. The barbarians damaged the outer parts of the rune temples but failed to destroy them, so the magic areas they lead to can still be used to create runes.
          • Player: What you said about a 'generous people' fits neatly with something Baba Yaga said. Before they became the Lunar Clan, her people travelled the world and taught others how to make runes.
          • Wizard: You mean, the barbarians taught us how to make runes?
          • Player: Um, yes. It seems that they did.
          • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Wizard before:
            • The Jury reacts to the argument.
            • The jury disagrees with your argument.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Wizard: There was a time when magic was considered lost, as the armies of wizards were thought to be destroyed. Some wizards retreated and lived lives as hermits until they felt it safe to take apprentices. Without them, magic would be a myth, a forgotten rumour.
      • Player: Think of the world without magic! We can thank it for fast communication, fast travel, alchemy and the enchantment of our tools and weapons.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Wizard before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Do you know any Fremennik?
      • Player: Do you know any Fremennik?
      • Wizard: I can't bring myself to. I see blood and death on their faces. They'd rather kill me than talk to me, anyway.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • The history of magic.
      • Ask about:
        • What is magic?
          • Player: What is magic?
          • Wizard: Psssh, that's not an easy question to answer. Some thinkers believe that magic can do anything, yet we are limited by our imaginations and ability to control the effects. We've barely begun to understand it.
          • The Jury reacts to the argument.
          • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
        • How did wizards learn to cast spells?
          • Player: How did wizards learn to cast spells?
          • Wizard: Learning to cast a spell takes little or no expertise. As soon as you have a rune in your grip, you can feel energies sparkig and coursing through you. What takes time - years of training and lifetimes of study, in fact - is controlling the effect of that energy and focusing it into something purposeful and intended. That's what we lost when the wizards were killed by the barbarians.
          • The Jury reacts to the argument.
          • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
        • How did wizards learn to make runes?
          • Player: How did wizards learn to make runes?
          • Wizard: There are stories, but that's exactly what they are - just stories. The real facts and histories were lost with the Mage Training Arena and Wizards' Tower, lost to fires. All we know is that a race or people found the altars and, rather than keep the knowledge to themselves, spread the knowledge to the world.
          • Player: How did you learn to runecraft?
          • Wizard: The knowledge was lost with the barbarian invasion, as s much else was. Who knows how we first learned to runecraft: your guess is as good as any other wizard's. We've all thought about it at some point in our lives.
          • Player: Hmm, the mysterious people you mention - the ones who spread news of the altars - fits with something Baba Yaga said. Before they became the Lunar Clan, Yaga's people travelled the world and taught others how to make runes.
          • Wizard: You mean the barbarians taught us runecrafting?
          • Player: Yes! Without the Fremennik, no runecrafting would ever have been possible. They even made the effort to share their knowledge.
          • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Wizard before:
            • The Jury reacts to the argument.
            • The jury agrees with your argument.
          • (Shows the initial options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Wizard: We almost lost magic forever! Wizards died, spellbooks were burned, and runes were crushed into the soil. I could have been a farm boy, a street urchin or worse. Magic has defined me, and I cannot imagine life without it.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Wizard before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Do you know any Fremennik?
      • Player: Do you know any Fremennik?
      • Wizard: I do not. There's any number of reasons for that, but the main one is that I can see the violence still in them. They could try it again: anyone can see that.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Baba Yaga[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • Can you tell me about the early history of the Fremennik?
      • Player: Can you tell me about the early history of the Fremennik?
      • Baba Yaga: We're defined by our violent nature and our simplicity, so our history should read something like: we were at peace, we fought, and now we're at peace again.
      • Player: Can't you tell me a bit more than that?
      • Baba Yaga: I could, but it wouldn't be any use to you.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why did the clan split up?
      • Player: Why did the clan split up? I mean, the Lunar Clan was once Fremennik wasn't it?
      • Baba Yaga: That's true. I'm interested to see if you remember: why did the Fremennik have issue with the Lunar Clan?
      • Player: Because you practise magic? The Fremennik are against the use of it, right? They exiled your clan and you made your way to the Lunar Isle.
      • Baba Yaga: So close! People forget that the Fremennik were keen on magic, like any other race. They had their seers and alchemists, but what they found disgusting - religiously abhorrent in fact - was that the Lunar Clan discovered the altars and were making runes that only gods should make.
      • Player: The Fremennik discovered runecrafting?
      • Baba Yaga: Ironic, isn't it? Before then, runes were gifts from the gods and precious commodities. Once our founder happened upon the essence mine, discovering that we didn't need gods to make runes, we all felt truly empowered. The leaders of the Fremennik weren't quite as open- minded: they threatened and cajoled, and we felt that our lives were in danger.
      • Player: So, why do the Fremennik not do magic at all?
      • Baba Yaga: Their anger and rage against the use of runes spread to their use of magic. It's got to the point where they believe they've always been against it.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Player: Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Baba Yaga: I couldn't tell you. The Lunar Clan were ostracised by that point.
      • Player: They invaded because of magic, right?
      • Baba Yaga: I have a theory, but you cannot and should not see it as fact. Before the Lunar Clan split from the Fremennik, a great deal of time was spent on locating the altars and building temples around them. For that reason, others found them and began runecrafting as well. News may have spread of the runes, and the Fremennik looked to kill anyone using them.
      • Player: So, the Fremennik could be the cause of the invasion! The reason for the genocide - the runes - were found and spread by the Fremennik themselves!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Baba Yaga before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • Can you tell me about the early history of the Fremennik?
      • Player: Can you tell me about the early history of the Fremennik?
      • Baba Yaga: We came, we fought, we conquered, we fought some more, and now we are at peace. There is no telling if it will stay that way.
      • Player: Can't you tell me a bit more than that?
      • Baba Yaga: I could, but it wouldn't help your case.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why did the clan split up?
      • Player: Why did the Fremennik clans split up? I mean, the Lunar Clan was once Fremennik, wasn't it?
      • Baba Yaga: That's true, you could say that we were the scholars of the Fremennik. Can you remember why the Lunar Clan split from the Fremennik? As a diplomat, you should remember.
      • Player: Was it because you practised magic, and the Fremennik were against the use of it? I remember that they persecuted your clan and you had to move to the Lunar Isle.
      • Baba Yaga: Close, but not quite! Other clans practised magic for various reasons, from fireworks to augury, but we were the clan to discover runecrafting.
      • Player: The Fremennik discovered runecrafting?
      • Baba Yaga: It does seem ironic, doesn't it? Runes had always been seen as gifts from the gods, a finite stock of riches. Then, the founder of our clan happened upon the essence mine and discovered that we didn't need gods to make runes. It was an empowering and revolutionary moment. We felt no need to hide their existence, but the other Fremennik saw that the essence mine and their ideology couldn't coexist, so they pushed us out of the clans and forced us to live on Lunar Isle.
      • Player: We have the Fremennik clan to thank for knowing how to make runes at all! Without your discovery, the wizards would have made no progress before or after the invasion.
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Baba Yaga before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Player: Why did the Fremennik invade the mainland?
      • Baba Yaga: We were cut off by that point, and certainly not unhappy about the fact.
      • Player: But it was to do with magic, wasn't it? You must know something about it.
      • Baba Yaga: I can certainly guess, but that's not the sort of talk for a courtroom. Before we left for the isle, we built temples about the runecrafting altars, which can only have attracted more attention to them. Other races likely found them and began mining for their own essence, which cannot have pleased the Fremennik. If they were so cruel to one of their own runecrafting tribes, think what they would do to outerlanders.
      • Player: But you don't know for certain why the invasion happened or what happened during the invasion?
      • Baba Yaga: No.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Entrance Guardian[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • What do you know of the history of magic?
      • Player: What do you know of the history of magic?
      • Entrance Guardian: I know that, long ago, runes were given to men so they could protect themselves when the gods left this plane. Man discovered that he could make runes himself and, thus, the real study of magic began. Rune guardians were created from rune essence to guard practitioners of magic. When the invasion happened, we were all destroyed, and only now are the places we guarded being rebuilt. I am happy to guard once again.
      • Player: You lost your life defending the Mage Training Arena, and much of its knowledge was lost forever. That is a grievous crime.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Entrance Guardian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Can you tell me about the Mage Training Arena's history?
      • Player: Can you tell me about the Mage Training Arena's history?
      • Entrance Guardian: This is actually the second Mage Training Arena. The first was destroyed during an invasion, so I am told.
      • Player: Weren't you there? Why can't you remember it?
      • Entrance Guardian: I was destroyed in the attack, and the trauma irredeemably damaged my memory. I'm told that we were invaded by barbarians.
      • Player: So, why was the first arena built?
      • Entrance Guardian: To some, magic is an abomination and should be wiped from existence. Others covet its powers. As you can imagine, this makes life as a wizard a dangerous one. We provide a safe haven for those who wish to practise magic.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What do you remember of the invasion?
      • Player: What do you remember of the invasion?
      • Entrance Guardian: Nothing at all.
      • Player: Not even a little?
      • Entrance Guardian: No. My memory from before my resurrection is impaired, and I am happy for that fact.
      • Player: Then there are no eye witnesses of the invasion left?
      • Entrance Guardian: None that I am aware of.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Entrance Guardian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • What do you know of the history of magic?
      • Player: What do you know of the history of magic?
      • Entrace Guardian: The history stretches back before to the gods, who left humanity with a stock of runes when they left this plane. Man came to depend on the runes, and eventually found their source: the essence mine. With that essence they created rune guardians, charged with defending magic, and built the Mage Training Arena. When the invasion came, the guardians couldn't protect the wizards; all rune guardians perished, alongside so many wizards.
      • Player: Members of the Jury, that may seem sad, but the rune guardians are lumps of stone made into warriors, so we shouldn't feel too sorry for them.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Entrance Guardian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Can you tell me about the Mage Training Arena's history?
      • Player: Can you tell me about the Mage Training Arena's history?
      • Entrace Guardian: This is the second Mage Training Arena, as the first was destroyed during the invasion.
      • Player: Who invaded?
      • Entrace Guardian: I only know what the wizards have told me: the barbarians swarmed over Asgarnia and Misthalin and killed most wizards and all rune guardians.
      • Player: So, why was the first Arena built?
      • Entrace Guardian: Wizards need safe haven to practise their magic, and not only to keep them safe from their own spells and experiments. Whether to steal or destroy, a wizard is often the target of violence.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What do you remember of the invasion?
      • Player: What do you remember of the invasion?
      • Entrace Guardian: Nothing.
      • Player: Not even a little?
      • Entrace Guardian: No. Our minds are fragile, and the trauma wiped any memories we had.
      • Player: Then there are no eye witnesses of the invasion?
      • Entrace Guardian: That is true.
      • Player: Why do we simply assume that the Mage Training Arena was destroyed during the invasion? No-one knows for sure, and we're relying on centuries-old gossip!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Entrance Guardian before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Olaf the Bard[edit | edit source]

If prosecuting:

  • Ask about:
    • What do you know about the splitting of the Fremennik tribe?
      • Player: What do you know about the splitting of the Fremennik tribe?
      • Olaf The Bard: The sagas tend to avoid that section of our history. It was a dark time for our tribe, when many of our sisters and brothers came to believe things that a clan shouldn't.
      • Player: What sort of things?
      • Olaf The Bard: The practising of magic and the making of runes, as if they were gods themselves. These are hugely blasphemous acts.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Can you tell me about the invasion?
      • Player: Can you tell me about the invasion?
      • Olaf The Bard: I'm sure I have a lyre somewhere; there's an epic poem that goes into it in some detail...
      • Player: Err, the highlights would be fine.
      • Olaf The Bard: Fair enough. It's thought that the leaders of the Fremennik, at that time, were keen on getting hold of more fertile land after some hard winters. They persuaded the Fremennik people that the land was owned by heretics, and the invasion began.
      • Player: So, it wasn't about magic? It was about increasing land holdings?
      • Olaf The Bard: It was about many things. I really do have several enchanting sagas and poems that would help you to understand.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Olaf The Bard: The invasion was devastating, so was a success in that sense. Good things came from it, though: the exchange of ideas and of goods; the opening of communication between different peoples; the creation of new nations and new towns and villages.
      • If the Jury didn't agree with the player's argument about Olaf before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury disagrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

If defending:

  • Ask about:
    • What do you know about the splitting of the Fremennik tribe?
      • Player: What do you know about the splitting of the Fremennik tribe?
      • Olaf the Bard: The sagas and poems tend to avoid that period, as there's little in the way of blood, dagannoth or mead in it. All I know is that some clans came to believe things that no right-minded Fremennik would believe.
      • Player: What sort of things?
      • Olaf the Bard: Blasphemy, heresy, hypocrisy. They wanted to make runes and practise the use of magic; something that no Fremennik would allow. They were exiled, and now live on the Lunar Isle.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • Can you tell me about the invasion?
      • Player: Can you tell me about the invasion?
      • Olaf the Bard: We call it the Great Invasion! There are few finer and bloodier wars in our history.
      • Player: Could you give us all the details?
      • Olaf the Bard: Of course. It was a hard time, as the land was barren and there were so many mouths to feed. Many of the common folk believed the droughts to be a punishment for runecrafting, so the clan leaders played on this belief and incited an attack on all the runecrafters on the mainland, hoping to gain the land they so desperately needed.
      • Player: So, it wasn't about magic? It was about increasing land holdings?
      • Olaf the Bard: It was about many things. Very rarely are wars started by one thing.
      • The Jury reacts to the argument.
      • The jury doesn't know what to think about your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • What was the result of the invasion?
      • Player: What was the result of the invasion?
      • Olaf the Bard: There were the negative results of an invasion - death, the pillaging of the land - but there were a great number of positives, too. Trade routes opened, knowledge was shared and families moved from a drought-ravaged land to fertile ground on the mainland.
      • Player: Although the initial invasion was a tragedy, much good has come from it!
      • If the Jury didn't disagree with the player's argument about Olaf before:
        • The Jury reacts to the argument.
        • The jury agrees with your argument.
      • (Shows the previous options.)
    • That's all, for now.
      • Player: That's all, for now. Thank you.
      • (Dialogue ends.)

Talking to the prosecutor[edit | edit source]

Only if defending:

Talking to the defender[edit | edit source]

Only if prosecuting:

All evidence presented[edit | edit source]

If the player has received one positive or negative jury response for each piece of evidence:

All evidence presented and witnesses interviewed[edit | edit source]

If the player has received one positive or negative jury response for each piece of evidence and each witness:

  • Judge: I think that is enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • (Proceed to 'Summary' below.)

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Which member of the Jury would you like to try to appeal to?
  • Opens Jury selection interface.
  • If prosecuting:
    • If the player made enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have conclusively proved that the H.A.M. attacked an innocent traveller simply because he was a goblin. Guthix was right, in a sense: happiness comes from balance. If every race stands equally, then we can feel more secure from persecution and fear. The H.A.M. Group deal exclusively in this persecution and fear, upsetting that balance.
    • If the player did not make enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, the H.A.M. have no fashion sense and no sense of humour. We can add the tendency towards senseless violence, too. The H.A.M. Group want to attack monsters, but look at what monsters have done for us: they have improved our combat skills, dropped some fantastic items, and we occasionally get to fight side-by-side with them.
    • Judge: Very well. Now, the Defence may present their case.
    • (Same as 'The defence's case: Full case' below.)
  • If defending:
    • If the player made enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, this generation of Fremennik owe nothing for the actions of their elders. An entire generation cannot be held accountable for the actions of those who lived hundreds of years ago. There is no doubt at all that the events were tragic - abominable, even - but no amount of compensation can change the past.
    • If the player did not make enough correct choices in their case:
      • Player: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, the Fremennik live in wooden huts and the wizards live in towers, guilds and expensive mansions. I think the wizards have done well for themselves. You could say that the barbarians today are still aggressive and likely to get violent, but they're not pillaging and committing genocide. They've turned over a new and bloody leaf.
  • (Same as Transcript:Court Cases § Pronouncing verdict.)

The prosecution's case[edit | edit source]

Only if defending.

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Prosecutor: My case rests on these points: I called a barbarian to the stand to detail the result of the invasion. Countless innocent people were killed, and the barbarians live on the land taken from the wizards. I then called a wizard. He confirmed that the result of the invasion was devastating to magical practitioners. Much knowledge was lost.

Full case[edit | edit source]

  • Prosecutor: Members of the Jury, I plan to persuade you that the wizards deserve compensation for the damage and distress caused by the barbarians. I will demonstrate that time does not heal wounds, but reparations will help ease the pain. The Prosecution calls Barbarian.
  • The Barbarian is called to the stand.
  • Prosecutor: What was the result of the invasion?
  • Barbarian: Many people died, on both sides, filling our tales with noble, honourable deaths. We gained land and settled there, forming the Barbarian Village, as outsiders call it.
  • Prosecutor: You and your people have gained considerably from the invasion, building on land that is soaked with the blood of wizards! Compensation is their right.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the prosecutor.
  • Prosecutor: The Prosection calls Wizard.
  • The Barbarian leaves the stand. The Wizard is called to the stand.
  • Prosecutor: What was the result of the invasion?
  • Wizard: The use of magic was almost lost to us! Runes were scarce and few wizards remained to pass their knowledge on to apprentices. The invasion nearly wiped us out.
  • Prosecutor: Which would have been an utter tragedy! Magic has brought us so much, and the wizards should be thanked for it.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the prosecutor.
  • Judge: I think that will be enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • Prosecutor: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have presented conclusive evidence that the wizards should be given reparations for past losses.
  • The Wizard leaves the stand.
  • Prosecutor: The wizards were nearly wiped out by the actions of these people. Compensation is not only deserved, but will help to get them back on their feet.
  • (Dialogue ends.)

The defence's case[edit | edit source]

Only if prosecuting:

Summary[edit | edit source]

  • Defender: My case rests on these points: I called Baba Yaga to the stand and asked her why the Fremennik clan split and formed the Lunar Clan. It turns out that the Fremennik originally discovered runecrafting, so we have much to thank them for. I then called Olaf, the bard. He suggested that good things came from the invasion, such as the exchange of goods and ideas.

Full case[edit | edit source]

  • Defender: Members of the Jury, I plan to persuade you that the current generation of Fremennik can't be held responsible for the actions of the past. The Defence calls Baba Yaga.
  • Baba Yaga is called to the stand.
  • Defender: Why did the Lunar Clan split up? I mean, the Lunar Clan was once Fremennik, wasn't it?
  • Baba Yag: We split once the founder of our clan discovered runecrafting.
  • Defender: The Fremennik discovered runecrafting?
  • Baba Yag: Runes were thought to be gifts from the gods and precious commodities. The founder of our clan then happened upon the essence mine, and discovered that we didn't need gods to make runes. The leaders of the Fremennik felt this was a religious affront, and that runecrafting was heresy. Infighting sparked in the tribes and, to save us all from self- destruction, the Lunar Clan removed themselves to the Lunar Isle.
  • Defender: So, we have the Fremennik to thank for knowing how to make runes! Without their discovery, the wizards would have made little or no progress.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the defender.
  • Defender: The Defence calls Olaf the Bard.
  • Baba Yaga leaves the stand. Olaf the Bard is called to the stand.
  • Defender: What was the result of the invasion?
  • Olaf The Bard: The invasion accomplished what all invasions do: destruction and loss of life. Good things did come as a result, too. There was the exchange of ideas and goods, and the opening of communication between different peoples. Many brothers and sisters settled in the far lands and led good lives there, getting on well with their neighbours.
  • Defender: Although the initial invasion was a tragedy, much good has come from it.
  • The Jury reacts to the argument and agrees with the defender.
  • Judge: I think that will be enough. It's time for you to summarise your case to the Jury.
  • Defender: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have attempted to persuade you that the Fremennik, as a people, are not responsible for the actions of previous generations.
  • Olaf the Bard leaves the stand.
  • Defender: What happened was tragic, but no amount of compensation will change the past.
  • (Same as Transcript:Court Cases § Pronouncing verdict.)

See also[edit | edit source]