RuneScape Wiki Post – Issue #8: Prayer: a noob skill?

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Issue #8


Who here is somewhat proficient at prayer? Raise your hands, now. Out of all of those people who just raised their hand, who has been called a noob for using prayer in a PVP situation? Chances are: all of you. It seems to be an opinion that is expressed towards anyone that isn’t a pure. For some reason, people seem to think that because they choose to not train their prayer skill, it is an unfair advantage in combat. When I duel friends, they say, “Hey, you had prayer on. This time, you can’t use prayer so it’ll be fair.” I have even heard from another player that they believe that prayer should not even be considered a skill.

What is it, specifically, that those players hate about prayer? It seems to narrow down to the fact that you can instantly remove 40% of their damage with the click of a mouse, and with another selection can increase your strength by more than what a strength potion could do, and then simply recharge that power later. Instead of actually training this skill themselves, they simply curse those who do with a belief that their godsword and 5 hours a day of training strength can instantly silence those prayers before they even form in our mouths.

But, not to fear. This is actually an overwhelming minority’s belief. I did a little bit of detective work myself, and these are the results of the survey I conducted on who thought that prayer is actually a “noob skill”:

Castlewars: 3 no 0 yes

Duel Arena: No response

Fist of Guthix: No response

Soul Wars: No response

Now, it may seem like I just didn’t actually try to find any answers, but I don’t think this is true. It seems to be more about the fact that most players who enjoy killing one another have more important things to do than name calling.

Personally, I’m just glad to find out that one of the combat skills isn’t as illegitimate as a few players would lead us to believe.

Wrathanet